When sports injuries strike, TCHC is there

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By Sarah Maninga, TCHC Certified Athletic Trainer

 

The fall sports season is well under way, and with that comes the risk of injuries associated with athletes.

As an athletic trainer, I am trained in evaluating injuries and make suggestions for the next step after injuries happen. This can include immediate care on the sidelines or a visit to sports A nurse applying a bandage to the inured knee of a female volleyball sports player.medicine, ReadyCare or the emergency department.

 

The right care, right away

When an injury happens at a sporting event, an athletic trainer is typically the first to run out onto the field or the first person to meet the athlete after they walk off the field. We see a wide variety of injuries ranging from bloody noses to broken bones.

When an athlete is down on the field or the court, the first thing we do is determine the extent of the injury. From there, we decide if we need more medical responders such as an ambulance. If we decide it does not require an ambulance, we can move the athlete to the sidelines and begin an evaluation.

This includes:

  • History (location of pain, peripheral symptoms, mechanism of injury, associated sounds and symptoms, history of injury)
  • Palpation (bony alignment, joint alignment, swelling, painful areas, deficit in muscles or tendons)
  • Joint and muscle function (range of motion, weight-bearing status)

After we go through the evaluation, we need to decide how to manage the injury. This can include putting a bag of ice on a sprained ankle, splinting a broken wrist or having the parents bring the athlete to the emergency department.

 

Care choices

So how do you choose where to take your child athlete when he or she gets hurt? It mostly depends on the injury, and you have multiple options to choose from.

 

Sports medicine. TCHC offers a Sports Medicine Clinic Monday through Friday from 8 to 9 a.m. at the Wadena Clinic. It is also offered at the Henning Clinic Monday through Friday byYoung injured boy playing the sport of basketball holding an ice bag on his head. appointment. This service includes a free sports injury evaluation by one of TCHC’s medical providers. All student athletes from elementary to high school are eligible.

This is a great option for overuse injuries such as tendinitis and for non-emergency acute injuries such as joint sprains and muscle strains.

If the medical provider determines that there needs to be additional testing or services after the evaluation, then fees for those services will be charged at that time.

 

ReadyCare is a walk-in clinic offered by TCHC. It is open Monday through Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon. This is a great option for a variety of illnesses and sports injuries including:

  • Minor lacerations
  • Minor traumas
  • Muscle aches and pains
  • Skin rashes/infections
  • Sprains
  • Strains

 

The emergency department is a 24-hour service open seven days a week. The emergency department is for more serious injuries such as broken bones or dislocations, but it is also an option when everything else is closed and an injury or illness can’t wait until the next day.

 

 

Photo of Sarah with her family.About the Author: Sarah Maninga has been an athletic trainer at TCHC since January 2015. She works with athletes at three area schools: Wadena Deer Creek, Sebeka and Menahga. During her time off, she enjoys spending her time with her husband on their small farm and doing anything that involves being outside, especially hunting and running.


Could abnormal posture be the source of your pain?

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By Erin Boesl, Physical Therapist, Henning Physical Therapy Clinic

 

The human body is asymmetrical. Our internal organs and bodily systems – neurological, respiratory, circulatory, muscular and vision – are not the same on the left side of the body as they are on the right. Even with this asymmetry, we create balance in how we move.

But sometimes, we can develop postural imbalances. Posture is the way our body is positioned when sitting or standing. Abnormal posture can develop at a young age or through daily, occupational and repetitive work.

Physical Therapist works with a patient on leg exercises.People also often overuse the dominant side of their body. Over time, this can lead to chronic muscle overuse or underuse, inflammation and pain. The pain then leads to other impairments and functional limitations, so we might not be able to complete daily activities.

Physical therapy is a great solution to posture imbalance.

We can perform an evaluation and develop a personalized treatment plan to suit your needs.

One of my patients, Jessica Strege, came to me with a pinched nerve in her neck and shoulder, as well as some chronic back pain. I discovered that most of her pain came from abnormal posture that actually stemmed from her diaphragm and pelvis.

Over six weeks, we used exercises to turn on and turn off certain muscles to improve her alignment. When muscles are in the correct resting position, they can begin strengthening more efficiently. After her treatment ended, Jessica said she no longer has pain every day like she did before.

If you have daily pain or postural imbalances, a physical therapist could help you find relief.

 

The following are some examples of imbalances or habits that might indicate bad posture.

 

Imbalances:

  • Asymmetry of the head and face. This means that one side doesn’t mirror the other side.
  • You can turn your head farther to one side.
  • One shoulder is higher than the other (typically left).Physical Therapist works with patient on leg exercises.
  • One shoulder blade protrudes more.
  • You can raise one arm higher than the other.
  • You can reach behind your back farther with one arm.
  • Your ribs protrude more in the front on one side (typically left).
  • Your chest expands more on one side when you breathe.
  • One side of your pelvis is higher.
  • One leg appears longer.
  • One foot turns out more than the other when standing or walking.
  • Your trunk can rotate more to one side than the other.
  • You have scoliosis with a right rib hump.
  • You have overdeveloped back or calf muscles on one side.

 

Faulty habits:

  • Sleeping on one side.
  • Always crossing legs one way while sitting.
  • Putting more weight on one leg when standing (typically right).
  • Turning your head to one side when reading.
  • Always holding a baby on one side.

 

Do you identify with any of these? If the answer is yes, now would be a great time for you to make an appointment with a physical therapist to see how we could help. Tri-County Health Care has rehab clinics in Henning, 218-548-5580; Bertha, 218-924-2250; and Wadena, 218-631-7475.

For more information, click here.

 

Erin with her family posing for a family photo.

Erin and her family.

About the Author: Erin Boesl, Doctor of Physical Therapy, has completed training with the Postural Restoration Institute. She can perform a specialized postural assessment and develop an appropriate treatment plan tailored to your postural asymmetry and dysfunction. Erin has worked for Tri-County Health care for 12 years, most currently at the Henning Physical Therapy Clinic. She is also a wife and mother of four children and resides in Parkers Prairie with her family.


Concussions: An Athletic Trainer’s Perspective

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Concussions, type it into Google© and you will end up with 14,500,000 results and all those articles can leave you with your head spinning in hundreds of different directions. Many of us hear about concussions daily and probably see something about them on the national news almost every night. If you have a child who plays sports you may be wondering if you should continue to let them play. I’m here to tell you that yes concussions can be scary, but that doesn’t mean we should wrap our children in bubble wrap and sit them on the couch.

So, what exactly is a concussion? A concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury. It occurs when direct and indirect forces are applied to the skull that result in the brain either rapidly accelerating or decelerating. This causes impairment of the brains functions.

The symptoms of a concussion can vary and all of them do not need to be present for you to be diagnosed with a concussion. Symptoms include a loss of consciousness, headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, poor balance, sensitivity to light, ringing in ears and sensitivity to noise, blurred vision, poor concentration, memory problems, drowsiness, fatigue, sadness, depression, irritability and neck pain.

A word of caution here: NO concussion is the same. If someone you know gets a concussion, don’t diagnosis yourself with their symptoms. People will react differently to them and there’s no set timeline saying how long a concussion will last.

One of the biggest things I think people forget is that concussions don’t just happen in sports. They can happen doing almost anything. Yes, anything! Sure, they are more likely in sports; however, you could be walking out to get your mail and get a concussion because you slipped on the ice and hit your head. You could be heading out to do your favorite winter activity like ice fishing and get a concussion because you slipped and bumped your head on the ground. Anyone can get a concussion.

So what do we do about concussions? In the sports medicine world, if we suspect a concussion in an athlete we remove them from the game and do a sideline assessment. This consists of rating symptoms on a scale of 0 to 6, immediate memory questions, concentration exercises, an eye/pupil exam and motor and balance exercises. We also check to ensure that all cranial nerves are functioning during this time. Once an athlete is diagnosed with a concussion they can’t return to play until they are symptom free and they have completed the “Return to Play” protocol. The “Return to Play” protocol lasts four days with each day consisting of the athlete gradually getting a little more into practice. The student athlete must remain symptom free through this protocol and if they don’t, then they go back and start over once symptom free again.

It is hard for anyone to completely prevent a concussion, but there are things we can do. We can make sure football and hockey players have up-to-date helmets and that our athletes/children are learning proper hitting and tackling techniques. We can educate coaches, parents and athletes about concussions, their symptoms and the importance of early diagnosis. If a concussion goes undiagnosed or an athlete returns to play before it is resolved it can have long-term effects, including post-concussion syndrome or second impact syndrome. Individuals with post-concussion syndrome can have concussion symptoms that persist for more than three months. Second impact syndrome is when a patient receives a second concussion before the first one is resolved.

Yes, concussions can be scary. That is why parents and coaches need to be aware of concussions, what the symptoms are, understand they can happen to anyone and know if you suspect a concussion to make sure the individual sees a health care professional as soon as possible. Early diagnosis will help the student athlete get back to the sport they love and help an adult get back to their daily activities sooner.

Bubble wrap not necessary.

 

About the author:

4x5 Maninga Sarah
Sarah Maninga has been the Athletic Trainer at Tri-County Health Care since January 2015. Her services are contracted with the Wadena Deer Creek and Sebeka schools. When she is not busy at the schools, she enjoys spending time with her husband on their small farm near Menahga and doing anything that involves the outdoors.

 

 


How I found my dream profession through the Summer Internship Program…

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By: Taylor Shamp

I believe I was in the 6th grade when I was first brought into see a physical therapist at Tri-County Health Care. It was those few weeks into my recovery when my gut told me “this is what you want to do with your life.”

Taylor playing High School Volleyball.

Taylor playing High School Volleyball for Bertha-Hewitt.

I am an up and coming senior at Bertha-Hewitt High School and daughter of not only one, but two Tri-County Health Care employees! My dad, Adam, works with the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) crew and my mom, Medley, with the Care Coordination team. I am also a three sport athlete, captain of the basketball team, recently elected as Bertha-Hewitt’s Student Council President and lastly, I aspire to be a Tri-County Health Care Employee.

I am fortunate to be one of the few seniors who already have a career path chosen, or so I thought. Have you ever made a decision or a goal for far off into the future? But, then maybe as the future becomes closer and closer to reality you’re not so sure anymore? And, you have to ask yourself “Is this really what I want or is this what I’ve been telling myself for the last five years?” You see, I made the decision to be a Physical Therapist so long ago that I wasn’t sure if I had just overlooked everything else because “my mind was made up”. This is exactly when I found the High School Summer Internship program at Tri-County.

2015 HS Summer Interns (Taylor is center, front row)

2015 HS Summer Interns (Taylor is center, front row)

The Summer Internship program is a two-month shadowing position where I was able to observe each of 13 different medical positions over the course of seven weeks. It was a blast! I got to see everything from stitches in a rural clinic to chemotherapy treatments on the main campus in Wadena. Then, the day came where I got to shadow the Rehab Department staff. I liked it so much they let me come back… TWICE! They had so much for me to learn and gave the best advice. This internship put my mind at ease and validated that yes; I indeed want to be a Physical Therapist.

I believe it was through these last seven weeks that I realized I wear a lot of different hats. I wear the hat of a daughter, a teammate, a captain, a leader and one day I plan to wear the hat of Taylor Shamp, Physical Therapist; where I can serve our community wearing the hat of a Tri-County Health Care Employee.

Taylor with her parents, and brother Cody

Taylor with her parents, and brother Cody.