Meet Ashley Steen

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Meet Ashley Steen, FNP, DNP. Ashley works in ReadyCare and is no stranger to a fast-paced work environment after working in similar roles for nearly a decade. Her experience ranges from correctional medicine to dementia care.

“I was so amazed at how friendly everyone is and welcoming! I have truly walked into one big happy family. The culture is outstanding, better than any other organization I’ve been with. “– Ashley Steen

 Where it all started

Ashley received a big career push early on in life at her first job caring for people with dementia. In this home, she assisted people with their bedtime routines, which can be very challenging. Dementia behavior often made the job difficult, forcing Ashley to grasp new care techniques quickly. According to Ashley, this was the job that sparked her interest in the healthcare field.

 Care for everyone 

Ashley’s father was a police officer, and her mother worked in court corrections. She got used to hearing stories about her father arresting the same people and her mother processing them. This experience made Ashley curious about the criminal justice system, and the impact healthcare can have on repeat offenders.

“My nurse practitioner program focused on social justice and transcultural nursing.  As part of our scholarly project, we focused on a culture. I chose the culture of corrections and how we could help with recidivism. I found we are releasing people back to their communities with little to no resources,” explained Ashley. Her research led to her developing a reentry program at the local jail. This program involved interviewing inmates and gathering data. From the data collected, she came up with ten resources that people need upon being released. After this experience, Ashley kept volunteering in the medical unit at the facility. She has been doing this for three years now

 “I can read all the journals, books, attend all the conferences, but until I took the time to sit down and work in corrections and be with inmates on a daily basis, I never truly understood the disparity we serve them at times. “– Ashley Steen

ReadyCare

For minor injuries and symptoms, consider using ReadyCare at Tri-County Health Care. ReadyCare is open Monday through Saturday. Patients should enter through the North Emergency Room entrance. Follow Tri-County Health Care on social media for future updates.


Choosing the right provider

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Happy new year, everyone! I’m excited to start the new year with fresh eyes and exciting new goals. One goal, in particular, is to continue living the mission of Tri-County Health Care and sharing that mission with potential providers. Choosing the right provider is tough, so I would like to start the new year with an added layer of transparency. I hope this blog will help me do that. In the world of recruitment and hiring, I see a lot of misaligned expectations and miscommunication. I want to clear all of that up and share my insider perspective about hiring potential providers with you. I hope that students will find this blog and take this information on their career adventure.

Students to professionals

Provider Recruitment is very different from typical recruitment as it is a longer, more complicated process. Often times, recruitment occurs over many years. I start tracking students and go to events to meet all sorts of people studying in the medical field. Each student that comes through our building is a potential hire. I start talking to them when they are still in undergraduate school. This is a planting the seed moment because I get the opportunity to introduce my organization while they are still finding their place in the world. Sometimes people need a little guidance or even a little push in the right direction. I want Tri-County to be a student-friendly place that can harness all natural and earned talents.

Lifelong learningChoosing the right provider is about choosing the right student.

My background is in education and what I admire most about providers is their appreciation for education. They spend so much of their lives pursuing knowledge and are lifelong learners. I observe this every day when I interact with our staff. Hearing them talk about this illness or that fracture, or even just talking about the human body in general, is always so fascinating. What I’m really getting at is, if I think someone is a good fit for Tri-County, they need to have an intense drive to acquire knowledge. Recruiters should look for perpetual learners that absorb every shred of knowledge they can. I want the people who stay up until 2 a.m. watching the Discovery Channel or someone who would rather play a trivia game instead of shooting pool during a night out.

Expectations and the changing medical landscape

I don’t want to alarm anyone reading this, but the medical community is in a state of disarray at the moment. I’m not just talking about the pandemic. There is a lack of trained medical staff in our country. Then, COVID hit and every provider was stretched professionally and personally. We can’t afford to lose providers. When I’m out on a recruiting mission, I see the value in each potential hire. I often find myself saying, “This is someone who could save lives; they just need the appropriate facility and tools.” Students should be aware of their value moving forward in their career but also know with high value comes great responsibility and often high expectations from employers. In many ways, choosing the right provider is about selecting the right student. Remember that.

What am I really looking for?

I think about that a lot so I sat down to itemize the things I’m looking for in a potential provider. I think this makes up a good candidate, and I actively look for these things when I’m recruiting.

 

  • A good fit is someone who wants to live in a rural area. Any provider we bring to interview must know upfront that we are in a rural area. Lots of trees and cows, if that’s not for you, we understand. If a provider is looking for a certain lifestyle that doesn’t fit what we can offer, it wouldn’t be a good mix.

 

  • A solid self-starter is always an attention grabber. I look for physicians who can handle working independently with a certain level of autonomy. To a certain extent, they will be operating their own practice; I want them to feel a sense of ownership and even crave it. This fosters a positive work setting for them instead of an overly corporate “do what you are told” environment. This leads to everyone being a lot happier, physicians and patients alike.

 

  • I’m always on the lookout for someone compassionate and caring. I need to detect a genuine desire to help others. A person can have all of the fancy degrees, be at the top of their class, and still have terrible bedside manner with no desire to care for the patient. The difference is readily notable; you can’t hide it.

 

  • Knowledge is a big part of choosing the right provider! You need to be smart or at least display the ability to gain knowledge semi-quickly. Like I discussed above, being a lifelong learner is pivotal in this role. You won’t make it in any hospital or clinic if you don’t keep your mind sharp. Learning doesn’t stop after you take the cap and gown off.

 

  • A clean record is always good. Over the years, I’ve trained myself to look for red flags. I work with a dedicated team that assists me in noticing if a potential candidate is running from something, quits jobs abruptly without notice, or likes to overly embellish their expertise. Be honest with yourself and me.

Susan Marco

The end goal

My hope is someone will read this blog, maybe one of those students eyeing graduation, wondering where life will take them next. I hope you will consider Tri-County Health Care. I promise I’m not that hard to please. Choosing the right provider is important. I just want Tri-County to align with people who genuinely care about helping others.

Susan Marco-Provider Recruitment Specialist

As a former professor, Susan is a purveyor of lifelong learning. Five years ago, she joined the Tri-County family and has since recruited some of the finest physicians and advanced practice providers around. She is an avid reader, published author and enjoys spending time with family when she isn’t exploring TikTok.


Medicine around the world: Dr. Chessor

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Alfredmy Chessor, M.D., is a family medicine doctor and has been helping patients at Tri-County Health Care since 2018. Since joining the Tri-County team, she has brought a unique brand of care not easily found elsewhere. She has been practicing medicine since 1998 and her devotion to health care has taken her all over the world.

Dr. Chessor has been employed with Tri-County since 2021

Going the distance

Dr. Chessor discovered her passion for medicine after visiting a doctor’s office in high school. The simple task of listening to a person’s heartbeat sparked her interest in the human body and started her path in the medical field.

Born in West Africa and raised in St. Paul, Minnesota, Dr. Chessor attended college at Xavier University in New Orleans and medical school at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. After school, her career began as a pediatrician in Miami, Florida. Her passion for helping children continued during her time with the US Navy, where she served as both a  Pediatrician and General Medical Officer. Her time with the armed forces thrust her into situations a typical doctor may never get the chance to experience, including a tour of duty in Iraq where she was tasked with helping wounded soldiers and marines during the Iraqi War. Then Dr. Chessor made her way back to Minnesota, where she completed her second residency, in Family Medicine, at Hennepin County Medical Center.

Liberia

However, her stay in Minnesota was not permanent. Soon she would make the journey back to Liberia. Dr. Chessor operated a missionary hospital and built her own practice in the capital city of the small West African nation. The practice grew until it was the premier medical clinic in the capital, frequently used by embassy staff and American visitors.

Dr. Chessor is also no stranger to infection control. Dealing with COVID-19 has been difficult for everyone but to her, it was just another challenge. While in Liberia, she assisted in containing the Ebola outbreak. She managed over 100 medical staff members at an Ebola treatment unit in a remote Liberian village. She later left Liberia and returned to Minnesota and joined Tri-County Health Care.

Tri-County strong

For Dr. Chessor, Tri-County Health Care offers a great deal of flexibility and variety. No two days are the same. Every aspect of her medical training is utilized and it goes even further in the team-focused environment. Having medical staff like Dr. Chessor enhances primary care beyond simple clinic appointments. People like her make the care special, with just a little bit of international appeal.

To learn more about Dr. Chessor and the entire team of primary care providers at Tri-County Health Care, click here.

About Dr. Chessor

Dr. Chessor works in family medicine at Tri-County Health Care. She has spent the last 20-plus years of her career helping people all over the globe. Dr. Chessor is married and has four children. In her limited spare time, she enjoys traveling, dancing, reading and exercising.

Dr. Chessor is a Family Medicine provider and got her start in pediatrics.